#Throwback Thursday: Museum studies student in anatomical modeling class, c. 1950.
This bust of the Piltdown Man still sits in our office. The Piltdown man is a paleoanthropological hoax, claimed to be found in a gravel pit in Piltdown, England, in 1912 and presented as fossilized remains of an early human. In 1953 the specimen was proven to be a fake, the combination of an orangutan jaw and a modern human skull. Learn more here.

#Throwback Thursday: Museum studies student in anatomical modeling class, c. 1950.

This bust of the Piltdown Man still sits in our office. The Piltdown man is a paleoanthropological hoax, claimed to be found in a gravel pit in Piltdown, England, in 1912 and presented as fossilized remains of an early human. In 1953 the specimen was proven to be a fake, the combination of an orangutan jaw and a modern human skull. Learn more here.

Throwback Thursday: Museum studies student, c. 1948.

Throwback Thursday: Museum studies student, c. 1948.

#WildWednesday: All European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in North America descended from 100 birds released in Central Park in the 1890s by a group who wanted America to have all the birds Shakespeare mentioned in his works. To date, 200 million starlings range from Alaska to Mexico.

#WildWednesday: All European starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in North America descended from 100 birds released in Central Park in the 1890s by a group who wanted America to have all the birds Shakespeare mentioned in his works. To date, 200 million starlings range from Alaska to Mexico.

Dunky made the list! We’re glad he’s not quite as terrifying when you see him in Iowa Hall

jtotheizzoe:

infinity-imagined:

MRI scans of a Human brain.

Slices of life

#ThrowbackThursday: Museum Studies Student with domestic pigeon (Columba Domestica) skeleton, circa 1950. This specimen is still on display in our lab!

#ThrowbackThursday: Museum Studies Student with domestic pigeon (Columba Domestica) skeleton, circa 1950. This specimen is still on display in our lab!

#WildWednesday: this skull came from a jaguar shot by former president Teddy Roosevelt while in Brazil in 1914. He gave the skull to his friend William Temple Hornaday, whose widow donated it to the museum following Hornaday’s death.

#WildWednesday: this skull came from a jaguar shot by former president Teddy Roosevelt while in Brazil in 1914. He gave the skull to his friend William Temple Hornaday, whose widow donated it to the museum following Hornaday’s death.

uimapcoll:

This is especially relevant right now! Stay safe, Iowans.

Important info as our state faces another summer of flooding!

(via prairielights)

#ThrowbackThursday: Museum director Charles Nutting holding a tuatara, 1922.
Tuataras (genus Sphenodon) are the only living members of the order Rhynchocephalia.They are reptiles, not lizards, and can live for over 100 years…so maybe the tuatara is still hanging out somewhere.

#ThrowbackThursday: Museum director Charles Nutting holding a tuatara, 1922.

Tuataras (genus Sphenodon) are the only living members of the order Rhynchocephalia.They are reptiles, not lizards, and can live for over 100 years…so maybe the tuatara is still hanging out somewhere.

#wildwednesday: this Atlantic tarpon (Megalops atlanticus) was caught by UI President Emeritus Walter Jessup in 1931. The fish is accompanied by the IOU (bottom left) but it’s unclear if Jessup owes the museum $20 for mounting the fish or if the museum owes Jessup money for giving us the fish.

#wildwednesday: this Atlantic tarpon (Megalops atlanticus) was caught by UI President Emeritus Walter Jessup in 1931. The fish is accompanied by the IOU (bottom left) but it’s unclear if Jessup owes the museum $20 for mounting the fish or if the museum owes Jessup money for giving us the fish.