Winner winner chicken dinner! Atlatl throwing for #archaeologyday. Thanks for sharing, Carissa Dewaele!

Winner winner chicken dinner! Atlatl throwing for #archaeologyday. Thanks for sharing, Carissa Dewaele!

#TBT: Student in anatomical modeling class, c. 1945

#TBT: Student in anatomical modeling class, c. 1945

#WildWednesday: #Trilobites were one of the earliest and most successful groups of arthropods, with 20,000 species roaming the world’s oceans from 520 to 250 million years ago. This #fossil, known as Isotelus, comes from Clayton County in northwest Iowa. It would have been found in the shallow seas in that area about 500 million years ago. Happy #nationalfossilday!

#WildWednesday: #Trilobites were one of the earliest and most successful groups of arthropods, with 20,000 species roaming the world’s oceans from 520 to 250 million years ago. This #fossil, known as Isotelus, comes from Clayton County in northwest Iowa. It would have been found in the shallow seas in that area about 500 million years ago. Happy #nationalfossilday!

UI Geoscience has been identifying fossils for visitors today for #EarthScienceWeek!

UI Geoscience has been identifying fossils for visitors today for #EarthScienceWeek!

#WildWednesday: Blue morpho butterflies appear vividly colored, but their wings are actually transparent. Rather than pigment, the wings contain nanostructures that reflect the light so the insects appear highly colored. The nanostructures continue to show vivid colors long after pigments fade. A team of London scientists is currently working to reproduce these structures synthetically: http://bit.ly/1Rohlj

#WildWednesday: Blue morpho butterflies appear vividly colored, but their wings are actually transparent. Rather than pigment, the wings contain nanostructures that reflect the light so the insects appear highly colored. The nanostructures continue to show vivid colors long after pigments fade. A team of London scientists is currently working to reproduce these structures synthetically: http://bit.ly/1Rohlj

#ThrowbackThursday: Museum techniques class, circa 1952. Our records indicate the man on the right is named Donald Benda, but we haven’t been able to gather any information about him. It would be interesting to know what happened to him, but record keeping is a tricky business.

#ThrowbackThursday: Museum techniques class, circa 1952. Our records indicate the man on the right is named Donald Benda, but we haven’t been able to gather any information about him. It would be interesting to know what happened to him, but record keeping is a tricky business.

Unlike seals, walrus (Obodenus rosmarus) cannot swim indefinitely and must rest, using their tusks to pull themselves onto ice or rocks. As the sea ice recedes into water too deep for the walrus, they have started gathering in record numbers on Alaskan and Russian beaches. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1ucbY9l

Unlike seals, walrus (Obodenus rosmarus) cannot swim indefinitely and must rest, using their tusks to pull themselves onto ice or rocks. As the sea ice recedes into water too deep for the walrus, they have started gathering in record numbers on Alaskan and Russian beaches. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1ucbY9l

#TBT: Studying in the Hall of Natural Science Library, circa 1926. 

#TBT: Studying in the Hall of Natural Science Library, circa 1926. 

#WildWednesday: Last week meteorologists noticed a strange, shape-shifting cloud over St. Louis that was southbound. After analyzing the reflections on radar they discovered it was a cloud of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrating to Mexico for the winter. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1uUV2V6.

#WildWednesday: Last week meteorologists noticed a strange, shape-shifting cloud over St. Louis that was southbound. After analyzing the reflections on radar they discovered it was a cloud of monarch butterflies (Danaus plexippus) migrating to Mexico for the winter. Learn more here: http://bit.ly/1uUV2V6.

Flashback Friday (since we’re a day late for Throwback Thursday): Professor Homer Dill, museum taxidermist and professor of zoology, on a specimen-gathering expedition in Washington, 1920. The back of the photo reads: “Professor Dill looks closely at some small mammals when he might have been looking at the scenery.” In 1926, Dill would succeed Charles Nutting as the museum director.

Flashback Friday (since we’re a day late for Throwback Thursday): Professor Homer Dill, museum taxidermist and professor of zoology, on a specimen-gathering expedition in Washington, 1920. The back of the photo reads: “Professor Dill looks closely at some small mammals when he might have been looking at the scenery.” In 1926, Dill would succeed Charles Nutting as the museum director.