Allen’s hummingbirds (Selasphorus sasin) breed only along a narrow strip of coastal California and southern Oregon. Males establish territories and then use an extravagant display of shuttling followed by a J-shaped dive to attract females.

Allen’s hummingbirds (Selasphorus sasin) breed only along a narrow strip of coastal California and southern Oregon. Males establish territories and then use an extravagant display of shuttling followed by a J-shaped dive to attract females.

#ThrowbackThursday: Bird room, museum, Hall of Natural Science, 1900s. Photo by Samuel Calvin. Thanks, as always, to the University of Iowa Special Collections and University Archives for making these resources available to us! 

#ThrowbackThursday: Bird room, museum, Hall of Natural Science, 1900s. Photo by Samuel Calvin. Thanks, as always, to the University of Iowa Special Collections and University Archives for making these resources available to us! 

iowaarchaeology:

We <3 our University of Iowa colleagues at we iowanaturalhistory.  They just took us to school!

Aww, we <3 you guys too!

iowaarchaeology:

We <3 our University of Iowa colleagues at we iowanaturalhistory.  They just took us to school!

Aww, we <3 you guys too!

#wildwednesday: the central cavity in an elephant’s skulls may have caused ancient cultures to believe they were Cyclopes, but it’s actually a nasal passage, with plenty of space around it for trunk muscles to attach. Pictured here is a skull of an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) found in Mammal Hall.

#wildwednesday: the central cavity in an elephant’s skulls may have caused ancient cultures to believe they were Cyclopes, but it’s actually a nasal passage, with plenty of space around it for trunk muscles to attach. Pictured here is a skull of an Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) found in Mammal Hall.

#ThrowbackThursday: Mr. Arnold painting in moose exhibit at the Museum of Natural History, 1928. You can still see the moose diorama in Mammal Hall today. Original from UI Special Collections.

#ThrowbackThursday: Mr. Arnold painting in moose exhibit at the Museum of Natural History, 1928. You can still see the moose diorama in Mammal Hall today. Original from UI Special Collections.

The redhead, Aythya americana, is infamous for laying its eggs in the nests of other redheads, at least 10 other duck species, and even the nests of the American bittern and Northern Harrier. Many parasitically laid eggs fail to hatch.

The redhead, Aythya americana, is infamous for laying its eggs in the nests of other redheads, at least 10 other duck species, and even the nests of the American bittern and Northern Harrier. Many parasitically laid eggs fail to hatch.

Check out these awesome shots of the new Mobile Museum in action at the MAPS Fossil Expo this past weekend. This has been such an awesome collaboration between the Pentacrest Museums and The Office of the State Archaeologist. Looking forward to more road trips soon!

#ThrowbackThursday: Whale in Museum, New Science Building, 1910. Photo by Samuel Calvin. Original from University of Iowa Special Collections &amp; University Archives. You can still see this beautiful right whale skeleton on display in Mammal Hall on the third floor!View the original here.

#ThrowbackThursday: Whale in Museum, New Science Building, 1910. Photo by Samuel Calvin. Original from University of Iowa Special Collections & University Archives. You can still see this beautiful right whale skeleton on display in Mammal Hall on the third floor!

View the original here.

#wildwednesday: Herky models a saber tooth cat skull at Hawkeye Caucus. Thanks to all our wonderful legislators for your support! &lt;3

#wildwednesday: Herky models a saber tooth cat skull at Hawkeye Caucus. Thanks to all our wonderful legislators for your support! <3

Throwback Thursday: Don Gould modeling glyptodon, 1920s.
The glyptodons were ancient armadillos that were roughly the size and weight of a Volkswagen Beetle.
The photo comes from the treasure trove of pictures in the Iowa City Town and Campus Scenes Collection in the Iowa Digital Library, which is curated by the University of Iowa Libraries University Archives and Special Collections folks.

Throwback Thursday: Don Gould modeling glyptodon, 1920s.

The glyptodons were ancient armadillos that were roughly the size and weight of a Volkswagen Beetle.

The photo comes from the treasure trove of pictures in the Iowa City Town and Campus Scenes Collection in the Iowa Digital Library, which is curated by the University of Iowa Libraries University Archives and Special Collections folks.